ThinkUDL is a podcast about Universal Design for Learning where we hear from the people who are designing and implementing strategies in post-secondary settings with learner variability in mind.

Join host, Lillian Nave, as she discovers not just WHAT her guests are teaching, learning, guiding and facilitating, but HOW they design and implement it, and WHY it even matters!

Latest Episodes

Allison Posey

Engaging the Brain with Allison Posey

Welcome to Episode 19 of the ThinkUDL podcast. In this episode I talk to author Allison Posey about her book Engage the Brain: How to Design for Learning that Taps into the Power of Emotion. Allison works as a Curriculum and Design Specialist at CAST and we had the chance to record this interview just […]

Elizabeth Coghill

Responding to neurodiversity and shifting campus culture with Elizabeth Coghill

Lillian interviews Elizabeth Coghill, Director of the Pirate Academic Success Center at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. Elizabeth outlines what her tutoring center is doing on the campus of East Carolina University to implement Universal Design for Learning strategies in a holistic way that welcomes all students to campus.

Suzanne Ehrlich

Partnering with Students and Faculty with Suzanne Ehrlich

In this episode, Suzanne and Lillian discuss the very interesting research Suzanne and her colleagues are doing with both students and faculty on the use and efficacy of UDL at UNF, the design and delivery of her UDL course in an effort to make area connections with UDL, as well as her role as a faculty fellow to build the UDL mindset with faculty across campus.

Andrew Dell’antonio

Decolonizing the Music Curriculum with Andrew Dell’Antonio at the Big XII Teaching and Learning Conference

This episode includes a discussion of the application of UDL principles in music and arts classes as well as how taking a UDL lens to the curriculum causes us to re-examine the overstuffed curriculum as well as the traditional curriculum in the music field. Andrew Dell’Antonio gives us some very interesting ways to think about UDL as a pathway to decolonize the kind of work we do, not just accessibility and content-wise, but as a way to question the way we teach in higher education in the United States so that UDL is considered as a place of practice to question the way we do pedagogy and curriculum.